The Need for Horse Rescue

 Duke

Horses need help.  According to the Colorado Unwanted Horse Alliance, there are approximately 5000 "unwanted horses" generated each year in Colorado, 250,000 nationwide. The current Horse Rescue Industry is limited in capacity and under strain on many fronts.

Animal Rights activists applauded the closure of horse slaughter plants in the United States in recent years. At the time of those closures, according to the Humane Society, nearly 100,000 horses were slaughtered for food yearly in the United States, the meat then shipped for food to France, Belgium, and Japan. What was not anticipated was the unintended negative consequence of the plant closures. Horses are still sent to slaughter, but now they are shipped to Canada and Mexico, where there are few regulations on their treatment, and therefore the horses suffer all the more. The transport of the horses was always one of the worst areas of maltreatment,

Duke

horses crammed into trucks designed for shorter animals, typically given no food, water, or rest, and now the journey is longer. The lack of a slaughter option has also affected the resale value of horses.Unless a horse is very valuable, young with good training and bloodlines, they bring a very low price at auction. The economy has taken a toll on horse ownership. Caring for a horse is an enormous expense and requires adequate boarding space. Average horse owners who can no longer care for a horse have options, and the result can be neglect for horses. Unfortunately, the lack of controlled breeding programs has added to the number of unwanted horses. Horses are being dumped in staggering numbers in pastures, state parks, and along rural highways. The BLM has faced great challenges in controlling the mustang herds living in our arid western states, competing for resources within national parks, and on farms and ranch land. The problem is approaching a tipping point.

Horse Rescues face challenges beyond those of small animal shelters. Adoptions of horses are difficult unless a horse is healthy and well trained. Donations are increasingly scarce, and the high costs associated with the care and feeding of horses has caused many rescues to close. Horse rescues near urban areas are experiencing pressure due to restrictions on the number of horses allowed on properties within or in proximity of city limits, and costs associated with permits and zoning for operation can be staggering.
 Moonwalker when he came to Blue Rose Ranch
Moonwalker when he came to Blue Rose Ranch
Sustainable Horse Rescues require passion, professional business acumen, and financial support. Blue Rose Ranch to date has rescued 1/3 of our horses from other horse rescues, from people who loved horses, but who did not have the ability to raise and manage the enormous expenses of caring for horses. The "unwanted" horse problem is growing and reaching a critical mass. Our vision at Blue Rose Ranch is to provide forever homes for horses on a national scope. Our goal is to continue expansion on a totally sustainable basis.  Moonwalker now a strong and healthy colt
Moonwalker now a strong and healthy colt





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